English as an Additional Language ATAR


 What is ATAR English as an Additional Language/Dialect all about?

 

Learning how in and through the English language texts (novels, short stories, film) influences your and others’ point of view about how cultures vary and the choices people make to adapt to those cultures that are different to their own.

Who should select these units in Year 11?

  • Students who select this course have not studied English as first language.
  • Students who have migrated to Australia and did not arrive more than seven years ago.
  • Students who wish to pursue university entrance exams with a view to further study.

Students wanting to select ATAR English as an Additional Language/Dialect will need to have successfully passed the Online Literacy and Numeracy Assessment (OLNA) in Year 10 or prequalified by achieving Band 8 or higher in the Year 9 NAPLAN.

 

Pathway

On completion of Units 1 and 2, there is logical progression of moving into Units 3 and 4 in Year 12, with a view to completing the WACE examination for entrance to university.

 

Areas of Study

UNIT 1 – Ways of Life

  • attitudes towards work and study: the importance placed on work or further study; cultural and gender preferences in relation to certain vocations
  • attitudes towards leisure and entertainment: the importance of music to a cultural way of life; story telling through art and music, dance and art forms

UNIT 2 – Making Choices

  • choices in relation to contemporary social and ethical issues: the impact of modern science and information communication technologies; the impact of personal and health choices; work-life balance;
  • choices in relation to global issues: migration; human rights; sharing research; international aid

To provide for different learning styles a variety of assessment tasks are used. For each course of study tasks are selected from:

  • fiction and non-fiction – novels, short stories assessed through contextual questions, essays
  • media texts – newspaper articles, magazine articles, editorials, advertisements, autobiographies assessed through feature articles and letters to the editor
  • visual texts – photographs, diagrams, charts, graphs, tables, cartoons, pictures assessed through synthesis of texts
  • written or spoken texts – dialogues, speeches, monologues, conversations assessed through oral presentations.

What is ATAR English as an Additional Language all about?

Students of ATAR English as an Additional Language or Dialect explore how learning in and through the English language impacts their identities and thought processes. They develop skills that enable them to use varying vocabulary of the spoken and written SAE so they can communicate successfully to become effective cross-cultural users of language and dialect.

Who should select these units in Year 12?

  • Students who select this course have not studied English as first language.
  • Students who migrated to Australia and did not arrive more than seven years ago.
  • Students who wish to complete a WACE certificate and pursue university entrance exams with a view to further study.
  • Students who have completed two units of English in Year 11.

Pathway

On the successful completion of Units 3 and 4 and in addition to other subjects, students are eligible for entrance to university.

 

Areas of Study

UNIT 3 – Australia as a Cultural Community

  • past and present: the refugee situation; impact of other cultures on the ‘Australian way of life’; what does it mean to be ‘Australian’;
  • freedom – a right or privilege: ability to pursue individual spirituality; ability to express individual views; and maintenance of first culture

UNIT 4 – Language and Empowerment

 

  • contemporary issues: politics; gender; poverty; dissent; ethnicity; generational attitudes; attitudes towards the environment;
  • challenges: using language to change attitudes towards minority groups; using language to support others moving between cultures; analysing ‘culture shock’

To provide for different learning styles a variety of assessment tasks are used. For each course of study tasks are selected from:

  • fiction and non-fiction – novels, short stories – contextual questions, essays
  • media texts – newspaper articles, magazine articles, editorials, advertisements, autobiographies assessed through feature articles and letters to the editor
  • visual texts – diagrams, graphs, tables, cartoons, pictures, synthesis of texts
  • written or spoken texts – dialogues, speeches, monologues, conversations assessed through oral presentations.